Peppermill Upat

The following is a page from a publication entitled To the Circus Born: Herman Fuller's Menagerie of Freaks. The identities of neither publisher nor author have been established, and scattered pages have been found inserted into Circus-themed books in libraries across the world. The person or persons behind this dissemination are unknown.


To the Circus Born

To the Circus Born: Herman Fuller's Menagerie of Freaks



The Skeleton Dance

"Now waggles the leg, now wriggles the thigh,
As the troop with strange gestures advance,
And a rattle and clatter anon rises high,
As of one beating time to the dance."

—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Der Totentanz

For as long as the preternatural performing arts have existed, man has reanimated the dead for entertainment. The particular act of animating the dead to dance was first popularized in Europe during the Late Medieval Period, where it became known as the Danse Macabre, or Dance of Death. The practice gained widespread notoriety partially due to rumors of its association with the Roman Catholic Church, which was said to sponsor public performances to provoke fear and inspire penance.

If this was indeed the intention, it failed spectacularly. The portrayal of death as a state of revelry and freedom captivated the imaginations and morbid fascinations of a continent that had ravaged by war, famine, and plague. The Danse Macabre proved so pervasive and influential that much of its cultural impact on music, literature, and visual arts was left intact during the historical expurgations carried out by the Secure Containment & Protection Foundation.

The Danse Macabre is traditionally carried out with the use of substitutiary locomotion; any form of resurrection risks the restoration or invocation of the soul, which is widely discouraged by the preter-performance community for ethical and practical reasons. The tale of the foolhardy necromancer who resurrects his Danse Macabre only to be killed and made to join the dance himself has been told and retold for centuries.

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To the Circus Born: Herman Fuller's Menagerie of Freaks

To the Circus Born

The Skeleton Dance

For as long as the preternatural performing arts have existed, man has reanimated the dead for entertainment. The particular act of animating the dead to dance was first popularized in Europe during the Late Medieval Period, where it became known as the Danse Macabre, or Dance of Death. The practice gained widespread notoriety partially due to rumors of its association with the Roman Catholic Church, which was said to sponsor public performances to provoke fear and inspire penance.

If this was indeed the intention, it failed spectacularly. The portrayal of death as a state of revelry and freedom captivated the imaginations and morbid fascinations of a continent that had ravaged by war, famine, and plague. The Danse Macabre proved so pervasive and influential that much of its cultural impact on music, literature, and visual arts was left intact during the historical expurgations carried out by the Secure Containment & Protection Foundation.

The Danse Macabre is traditionally carried out with the use of substitutiary locomotion; any form of resurrection risks the restoration or invocation of the soul, which is widely discouraged by the preter-performance community for ethical and practical reasons. The tale of the foolhardy necromancer who resurrects his Danse Macabre only to be killed and made to join the dance himself has been told and retold for centuries.

335


335

The Skeleton Dance

To the Circus Born

To the Circus Born: Herman Fuller's Menagerie of Freaks

For as long as the preternatural performing arts have existed, man has reanimated the dead for entertainment. The particular act of animating the dead to dance was first popularized in Europe during the Late Medieval Period, where it became known as the Danse Macabre, or Dance of Death. The practice gained widespread notoriety partially due to rumors of its association with the Roman Catholic Church, which was said to sponsor public performances to provoke fear and inspire penance.

If this was indeed the intention, it failed spectacularly. The portrayal of death as a state of revelry and freedom captivated the imaginations and morbid fascinations of a continent that had ravaged by war, famine, and plague. The Danse Macabre proved so pervasive and influential that much of its cultural impact on music, literature, and visual arts was left intact during the historical expurgations carried out by the Secure Containment & Protection Foundation.

The Danse Macabre is traditionally carried out with the use of substitutiary locomotion; any form of resurrection risks the restoration or invocation of the soul, which is widely discouraged by the preter-performance community for ethical and practical reasons. The tale of the foolhardy necromancer who resurrects his Danse Macabre only to be killed and made to join the dance himself has been told and retold for centuries.

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336

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